Status: Destroyed I was fortunate enough to visit the mud huts back in 2015 before they were destroyed.  At the time, the owner Joseph "Isseppi" Diliberti, was battling the county over fire prevention citations which he couldn't afford. Places like this are so far and few in between--especially in San Diego.  The mud huts were not just an architectural work of art, they were

In 1890, the city built a trolley railway going through University Heights. Once the railway was up and running, John D. Spreckles anticipated ways to encourage people to use it.  One of his incentives was to build a 5 acre botanical garden, free to all ticket-holding passengers.  The garden was built on the far west end of Adams ave &

Since our original posting of the Rum Runners Cave there have been a number of comments seeking to prove it was a Prohibition-era booze smuggling center and others refuting that claim.  While it may never be known exactly what went on here during those years, the truth appears to be that what remains here are remnants of an amazing construction project undertaken

Article by David JohnsonThe mid-air collision of a small private plane and a Pacific Southwest Airlines (PSA) jetliner in the skies above North Park September morning in 1978 shattered San Diego like no single incident has before or since. Wars, terrorist attacks and political assassinations have had a far greater impact on the country as a whole, but this was

Until the late 80's, Scripps Ranch was considered nothing more than an out-of-the-way town with very little use or purpose. Before the suburban boom, Scripps Ranch was originally a 400 acre ranch owned by E.W. Scripps whom later expanded it to 1,200 acres. Edward Scripps was was an American newspaper publisher and founder of The E. W. Scripps Company. In 1898,

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